City Center, Chandigarh, India, 1950 - 1965
New Delhi is a strange mixture of buildings, including medieval Hindu, Pathan and Mogul structures as well as edifices in the British Colonial style. Le Corbusier wished to avoid such incoherence in the City Centre by creating a construction scheme for all buildings erected or to be erected here. The plans can constantly vary in keeping with their functions as office buildings, hotels, shops, etc.

The City Centre consists of different squares tied together by broad avenues. Ai the present time, when this centre is still devoid of any sort of vegetation, the unshaded open areas can be quite unpleasant.This sector 17 is virtually uninhabited, but it is enlivened during the daytime by the many shops, bazaars, restaurants, cafés, banks and department stores.There is no doubt that at present the City Centre still looks like an experiment. The urban articulation hors is in sharp contrast to the "oriental" bazaar streets, the narrow alleys full of noise and plunged in shadow.Of all the cities of India, only Chandigarh can claim to be an absolutely modern town, “untouched by the tradition of the past", as Jawaharlal Nehru so aptly remarked.The execution of the buildings for the City Centre was assigned to different Indien architects. Pierre Jeanneret conscientiously supervised and organized the schemes determined by Le Corbusier.The plans can vary as required, but must respect a sufficiently large open surface along the façades as anti-glare protection.
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City Center, Chandigarh
© FLC/ADAGP
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City Center, Chandigarh
© FLC/ADAGP
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City Center, Chandigarh
© FLC/ADAGP
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City Center, Chandigarh
© FLC/ADAGP
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City Center, Chandigarh
© FLC/ADAGP
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